New Patients

Download our forms here

Medical and Dental History Form- Adult

Please complete this in full and bring to your New Patient Appointment, along with a current list of medications and your dental insurance information.

Medical and Dental History Form-Child

Please complete in full and bring to your child’s New Patient Appointment. The more we know about your child, the better the experience will be!

Office Policy Form

Please complete in full and bring to your New Patient Appointment. The Stoney Creek Family Dental Team is dedicated to keeping your personal information confidential. We kindly ask you to give our dental team 48 hours notice to change an appointment time, as we reserve this time specially for you.

FAQ

My dentist is recommending treatment (I know nothing about). What should I do?

Ask questions. It sounds simple enough, but sometimes we feel embarrassed to ask simple questions. There is no need to feel that way.

You will feel much better, and be able to make a better decision, if you understand the dental procedure that is recommended to you. If you don’t say anything, your dentist may think that you already understand.

Here are some tips when asking questions. Ask:

 

  • If you can see any pictures of the procedure or what it looks like when it is done;
  • How many times your dentist has done this procedure in the past;
  • How much it will cost;
  • How long it will take;
  • If it will need to be redone in the future;
  • If there are alternatives to the procedure and if so, what are the pros and cons of each option.

The final decision about how and when to proceed with any treatment is yours.

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first time?

The Canadian Dental Association recommends the assessment of infants, by a dentist, within 6 months of the eruption of the first tooth or by one year of age. The goal is to have your child visit the dentist before there is a problem with his or her teeth. In most cases, a dental exam every six months will let your child’s dentist catch small problems early.

Here are 3 reasons to take your child for dental exams:

  • You can find out if the cleaning you do at home is working.
  • Your dentist can find problems right away and fix them.
  • Your child can learn that going to the dentist helps prevent problems.

Do I really have to go to the dentist every six months? Do I need x-rays at each visit?

How often you go for dental exams depends on your oral health needs. The goal is to catch small problems early. For many people, this means a dental exam every six months. Your dentist may suggest that you visit more or less often depending on how well you care for your teeth and gums, problems you have that need to be checked or treated, how fast tartar builds up on your teeth, and so on.

How often you need to have x-rays also depends on your oral health. A healthy adult who has not had cavities or other problems for a couple of years probably won’t need x-rays at every appointment. If your dental situation is less stable and your dentist is monitoring your progress, you may require more frequent x-rays.

If you are not sure why a particular x-ray is being taken, ask your dentist. Remember that dental x-rays deliver very little radiation; they are a vital tool for your dentist to ensure that small problems don’t develop into bigger ones.

When should I take my child to the dentist for the first time?

The Canadian Dental Association recommends the assessment of infants, by a dentist, within 6 months of the eruption of the first tooth or by one year of age. The goal is to have your child visit the dentist before there is a problem with his or her teeth. In most cases, a dental exam every six months will let your child’s dentist catch small problems early.

Here are 3 reasons to take your child for dental exams:

  • You can find out if the cleaning you do at home is working.
  • Your dentist can find problems right away and fix them.
  • Your child can learn that going to the dentist helps prevent problems.

Dental plans, offered by many employers, are a means to help you pay for your dental treatment.

Most Canadians enjoy dental plans and the insurance companies that provide them are benefit carriers. Carriers reimburse patients based on the level of coverage decided by the patient’s employer.

When you visit the dentist, it’s the dentist’s role to make a treatment plan based on your oral health needs. Your needs may be different from what is covered by your dental plan. It is your right to decide whether to go ahead with any treatment.
You should not decide based on what your plan covers. If you agree to have the treatment, it’s your responsibility to pay for it. It is the responsibility of the benefits carriers to reimburse you for the amount covered by your dental plan.

Many dentists are willing to contact a patient’s benefits carrier, on a patient’s behalf, to find out if a treatment is covered. The patient must pay the portion that’s not covered and the dentist may offer a payment plan to help.
We offer flexible payment plans to those who require extensive work that would be financially difficult to address with limited insurance or those lacking insurance. Talk to our friendly staff to see how we can find a plan that best suits your needs.

What′s the difference between the bleaching I can do at home with a kit from the store and the bleaching that my dentist does?

Dentists have been doing what’s called “non-vital” bleaching for many years. Non-vital bleaching is done on a damaged, darkened tooth that has had root canal treatment. “Vital” bleaching is done on healthy teeth and has become more popular in recent years.

Vital bleaching, also called whitening, may be carried out in the dental office or the dentist may instruct the patient on how to do the bleaching at home. There is also a wide variety of products for sale in stores. Not all products are the same and not all give you the same results.

Different products, including those used by dentists, may also have different risks and side effects. Ask you dentist to overview which options work best for your unique situation and desired treatment outcomes.